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Clean your Cutters

Pitch, tar, and resin build up quickly when cutting wood and can gum up saw blades until they cut like dull ones. Follow this simple process to restore them.

  • Clean your Cutters

    Pitch, tar, and resin build up quickly when cutting wood (especially soft woods, such as pine) and can gum up saw blades until they cut like dull ones, leaving behind burn marks and tearout. A few dollars worth of supplies—an oil-change pan or 5-gallon-bucket lid, a brush, and some blade cleaner (we like CMT Formula 2050, no. 817541, woodcraft.com)—combined with a little elbow grease could save you a trip to the sharpening shop. Just follow this simple process to restore your blades. For safety, work in a well-ventilated area and wear gloves and eye protection.

  • Prevent teeth grinding

    When soaking multiple blades, slide plastic lids (such as those from yogurt or margarine containers) between the blades to prevent the teeth from chipping.

  • Select a scrubber

    Steel-bristle brushes cut through grime quickly, but they can also damage or dull your blade's carbide teeth. Scrub with nylon or brass brushes instead.

  • Splash on the solution

    Spray or pour the cleaning solution on your blades. Let the blade sit for 15-20 minutes; then scrub the cutting edges and the gullets between the teeth.

  • Put on a protective coat

    Wipe the blade dry with a clean cloth; then apply a rust-blocking sealant, such as Bostik BladeCote (no.124626, woodcraft.com).

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