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FREE Woodworking Charts

Download these great charts for use in your shop.

Instructions

To view the charts on your screen, and print them using your printer, you must have Adobe Acrobat Reader version 4.0 (or greater) installed on your computer. It's free for you to download, and you only have to download it once! For answers to frequently asked questions, see the bottom of this article.

Drill Press Speed Chart

If you're like most woodworkers, you have at one time or another ruined an expensive drill bit or cutter by running it at too high a speed in your drill press. So how do you go about finding out the recommended operating speed for any given tool so this doesn't happen? Up until now, it's been almost impossible! This chart provides a comprehensive guide.

Wood Screw Chart

What's there to know about screws, except that you never seem to have enough of the right kind when you need them? Our downloadable chart references the gauge, head-bore size, shank-hole size, pilot-hole size and available lengths of traditional wood screws and production screws.

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Lumber Sizing Chart

Easy board foot calculation Hardwoods sell in grades by the board foot, a basic unit of measurement that equals a 1"-thick board that's 12" wide and 12" long. That's because hardwoods--unlike softwoods-aren't cut and milled as dressed, sized lumber in standard nominal dimensions (2X4, 1X6, 4X4, etc.) to only be cut to length for construction. Instead, mills saw hardwoods into random widths and lengths to best take advantage of the clear wood in a log. Hardwoods do come in nominal thicknesses, such as 1", 114 ", etc. (often referred to as four-quarter, five-quarter, and so on), that actually are a bit shy of the stated thickness. Therefore, you'll pay for a 1"-thick measurement but actually be getting about 316 " less. Board widths aren't standardized. Typically, the dealer will "round up"; to the next inch of width and charge you for it. To help you in estimating stock and cost for the projects you want to build, download the chart using the link below that gives you the amount of board feet in a range of common hardwood dimensions you'll likely come across where you shop for wood.

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Decimal and Millimeter Equivalents

Router lifts and dial indicators often show measurements in thousandths of an inch (.001"), but woodworkers tend to think in fractions, not decimals. Click here to download a handy fractions-to-decimals conversion chart to keep by your router table and tablesaw. Use this chart to convert fractions to metric or decimal values. Measurement conversions start at 164 " and end at 6464 " (1"). 

Glue Chart

Determing the best adhesive for the job with this guide to choosing and using woodworking glues

FAQs

Q: What is Adobe Acrobat Reader? A: Adobe Acrobat Reader is a computer program that reads our chart and allows you to display and print the information on your particular computer. Adobe Acrobat produces a file type (.pdf) that is compatible with most all computer types. You will need to install Adobe Acrobat Reader on your computer to view and print your charts.

Q: Do I have to install Adobe Acrobat Reader on my computer? A: Most new computers are shipped with Adobe Acrobat Reader already installed. Since so many files are now being offered on the internet in Adobe Acrobat format, you'll be able to use this program for many other applicatons. If you don't have Adobe Acrobat Reader installed on your computer, don't worry. It is easy to install, and it is free to download from Adobe. Remember, you only have to install Adobe Acrobat Reader once to be able to use your charts. 

Q: Do I need any special fonts installed on my computer? A: No, we've embedded all the fonts required for the plans within the Adobe Acrobat file.

Q: Are the drawings, photos and text all in the same file? A: Yes. The pages that appear on your computer screen are just like those found on the pages of WOOD magazine. Note: The downloadable plan typically uses a few more pages than the magazine. This is because we've enlarged most of the drawings to make them easier to read on your printed out version.

Q: Will the drawings print clearly using my inexpensive printer? A: Yes. They should print fine on most printers. We’ve made the drawings as large as possible, typically filling up the entire 8.5 x 11" page.

Q: Can I use the charts offline? A: Yes. The file is downloaded onto your hard drive to be used whenever or as many times as you like.

 

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