A. Truly "waterproof" glues, such as epoxy and resorcinal, maintain their bonding strength below waterline (as when submersed) and in structural applications.

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154-Wooden Boat
Waterproof epoxy works well above and below water. Boatbuilders use it because of its durability and gap-filling quality.

A. Truly "waterproof" glues, such as epoxy and resorcinal, maintain their bonding strength below waterline (as when submersed) and in structural applications. They also can stand up to the duress of heat. These characteristics classify waterproof glues as type 1. A glue such as Titebond II, a catalyzed polyvinyl acetate, is labeled "water resistant" because water will not effect its bonding ability when used in an outdoor application. That makes it a good choice for patio and deck furniture crafted from wood. And though occasional rain will not cause it to fail, it should never be used for heavy-duty structural applications as in the making of laminated beams, or for wooden boatbuilding. For this reason, Titebond II classifies as a type 2 glue.

A. Tom Murrah, a technical support manager at Delta Machinery, says that the choice between the two tool tabletop materials depends on the application, with aluminum used primarily in smaller tool tables and table wings. Cast iron offers several advantages for larger tables. These include "flatness, stability, and a more precise machining for miter slots. Cast iron, due to its much heavier weight, tends to dampen tool vibration as well." You will need to protect it form rusting. By contrast, says Tom, "lightweight aluminum tabletops cost less, are more portable, but they can flex and bend in larger tables."

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Manufacturers use aluminum when making tables for smaller, more portable tools, such as scrollsaws, mitersaws, and this sander. Rigid cast iron works better for larger tables.

A. According to Guinness World Records 2004, the largest wooden bowl-turned in 1997-measures 10' in diameter and weighs approximately 1,600 lbs. It was made by Frank and Hugh Patrick of Patrick's Turning Point in Barnesville, Georgia. "I did 99 percent of the turning," says 77-year-old Frank, a professional architectural woodturner since 1949. "It was a commissioned piece for a concrete company that wanted a mold for creating a fiberglass and rubber form. From this they make concrete bowls."

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A worker at Patrick's Turning Point takes this world-record poplar bowl for a spin. It took six weeks to glue-up, turn, and sand.