Like the head of a combination square, a ruler stop helps you make consistent layout marks from the edge of a workpiece. I made a ruler stop for nearly every steel rule in my shop, using scraps and a few pieces of hardware.
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Drawing of measurement stop

Like the head of a combination square, a ruler stop helps you make consistent layout marks from the edge of a workpiece. I made a ruler stop for nearly every steel rule in my shop, using scraps and a few pieces of hardware.

Start by cutting the top and bottom to rough size, making the top thick enough to house a T-nut. Counterbore for the head of the T-nut and install it.

Next, sand or plane stock to just a hair thicker than the rule. Cut spacers from this stock and glue them between the top and bottom, with the T-nut on the inside, as shown, using the width of the ruler as a guide for placement and spacing. I added machine screws with cap nuts to reinforce the joint. Frankly, they're overkill, but I like the way they look. 

Once the assembly dries, sand it to final size, smoothing all the edges. File and sand the end of the stud on the knob smooth so it doesn't scratch the ruler. It only takes light pressure when tightening the stop to secure it. 

—William Hertwig, Plymouth, Mass.

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