Woodworkers usually work alone, but there are times—such as when trying to assemble large casework—when we just need someone (or something) to help hold things together.

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LIKE HAVING AN EXTRA SET OF HANDS

Woodworkers usually work alone, but there are times—such as when trying to assemble large casework—when we just need someone (or something) to help hold things together. I made a set of scrapwood work holders, shown at left, that have proved invaluable in my shop. Essentially, they're small versions of a doormaker's jig, with a base and two uprights. Prop up a panel on edge in the middle of a base and slide the uprights together to hold it while you align, glue, and screw.

Reversing and centering the uprights on a holder gives you a 90° cradle that is 45° from perpendicular. I use a set of holders in this configuration when working on the face of a corner cabinet because they keep the cabinet in a front-up position.
—James LeMaster, Martinsburg, W.Va.