I have a granite remnant left over from a kitchen remodel, and want to use it as a top for a coffee table. My challenge: How do I attach the slab to my table assembly?

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Capture squeeze-out. Outline the baseu2019s footprint with masking tape, and mask the base too. Wipe away excess adhesive and remove the tape before the adhesive dries.

Q:

I have a granite remnant left over from a kitchen remodel, and want to use it as a top for a coffee table. My challenge: How do I attach the slab to my table assembly? I'm guessing drilling into the granite is not an option.
—Neil Thackery, Allendale, Mich.

A:

You're correct, Neil; drilling into granite requires special tools and expertise, and could fracture the slab if done wrong. We checked with several cabinet and countertop installers, and they all suggested using an adhesive. So we asked experts from Franklin International (makers of Titebond adhesives), DAP, and Liquid Nails. They all agree that the best choice would be a polyurethane construction adhesive, such as: Titebond GREENchoice Premium Polyurethane Construction Adhesive, DAP SmartBond Heavy-Duty Construction Adhesive, or Liquid Nails LN-950 Polyurethane Adhesive.

Although your installer might have used a silicone-based product to secure your kitchen countertops to the cabinets—a popular choice among the installers we surveyed—our experts advise against this. Because your table will likely be in a location where it might be bumped or moved around occasionally, you need the reliability of an adhesive with more grip than silicone can provide.

Because it's difficult to clamp an assembly such as this, weigh down the base with heavy objects until the adhesive has dried for 24 hours.

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Because it's difficult to clamp an assembly such as this, weigh down the base with heavy objects until the adhesive has dried for 24 hours.
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