Balancing a router with a flush-trim bit along a workpiece edge as you remove excess iron-on edge-banding can ruin a shelf with the slightest tip.

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Balancing a router with a flush-trim bit along a workpiece edge as you remove excess iron-on edge-banding can ruin a shelf with the slightest tip. But a router with a 14 " straight bit and this jig trims edging without risking gouges. To make this jig, cut an 8" square base from 12 "-thick medium-density fiberboard (MDF) or plywood. Then cut a 14 "-deep kerf centered on the bottom. From 34 " plywood or MDF, cut a 3 1516 x 8" fence, and glue it to the base flush with the kerf, as shown above left. Using a 34 " plywood scrap to stabilize the base, drill a 34 " centered hole with a Forstner bit.

Next, insert a 14 " straight bit in your router. With the bit centered in the hole (and the kerf), mount the router to the jig with double-faced tape. Then adjust the bit depth so the tip comes to just below the bottom surface of the base. Test the setting on plywood scrap to make certain the bit doesn't leave score marks on the surface.

To trim edge-banding, clamp the workpiece into position, as shown right. Push the jig base firmly against the workpiece surface and edge with the surplus edge-banding inside the kerf. Turn on the router, slide the jig along the banded edge, and trim off the overhanging edge-banding. Edge-banding still proud of the surface can be sanded away with 180-grit abrasive.

The heat from the spinning bit may reactivate some of the edge-banding adhesive, causing it to stick to the bit. Remove it immediately with a blade and bit cleaner, such as Empire Blade Saver (amazon.com).