Incra MITER V27 Miter Gauge

WOOD magazine rating
Average reader rating
4.6
out of 5
Brand:
Incra
Model:
V27
Price:
$50

Description

The INCRA Miter V27 is engineered to provide a high performance, yet low cost upgrade for your tablesaw, bandsaw, router table, disc sander, belt sander or any other tool in need of a better miter gauge. Like all INCRA Miter Gauges, the V27 delivers extreme miter cutting accuracy through the advanced combination of INCRA's exclusive AngleLOCK indexing system and its patented Adjustable GlideLOCKMiter Bar.

While the V27 delivers all of the accuracy of its bigger INCRA Miter Gauge brothers, its no-nonsense design and compact size make it the most affordable INCRA Miter Gauge.

The Miter V27's compact protractor design works on applications typically not candidates for aftermarket gauges because of the narrow distance between the cutter and miter slot.

The Miter V27's adjustable miter bar will fit standard square-sided miter slots measuring 3/4" wide, 3/8" deep, and with or without a 15/16" T-slot at the bottom. The miter bar's adjustment range accommodates actual slot widths between 0.740" and 0.760".

The Miter V27 Universal Mounting Bracket will support any user-made fence as well as any INCRA fence.

WOOD magazine review

Spot-on accuracy at a great price

Review Summary

High points: 60° clockwise and counterclockwise miter range is wider than gauges costing 2–3 times more. Top-adjusting miter bar. The lowest-cost miter accessory in our test, and the miter angle proved dead-on accurate. Low points: No fence included. More points: Positive miter stops every 5°, plus 22.5°, but the distance between the miter scale and the pointer makes non-stopped angles tougher to hit precisely.

Detailed Ratings

4.8
out of 5

Performance

5

Features

4

Ease of Use

5

Value

5

Reader Reviews

Incra V27 Miter Gauge

Review Summary

The V27 is Incra’s entry level basic gauge retailing at about $60 and is constructed primarily of sturdy steel with some well placed nylon trim pieces. The bottom of the steel protractor head glides on a nylon pad that rides along the table surface. The Incra has a “GlideLOCK” miter bar that consists of 4 expandable nylon adjustment spacers in the bar to be perfectly taylor fitted to the standard 3/4”x3/8” miter slot on your saw.
There is a removable t-clip on the end of the bar for added holding stability in slots that have a t-groove. The V27 features 27 indexed angle settings with laser cut notches every 5 degrees plus a couple extra for the most popular angles. It’s held firmly in place with Incra’s “AngleLock” – a positive locking steel pointer that fits perfectly into the v-shaped notches . It also has one degree hash marks on the protractor compass for more minute adjustments. The push handle is a robust hard plastic round knob mounted just behind the face. Overall it’s well built but is a little lighter duty than my stock cast iron gauge. It is however considerably more precise. My gauge was not dead-on as received out of the package. Adjusting the miter head square to the bar is a bit tedious and requires loosening 4 hex screws in the face using the supplied hex wrench, and manually aligning it to a reference like the miter bar or miter slot. Once dialed in, it’s very accurate and stays put. Another task that’s a bit tedious involves the Glidelock bar width adjustments. Three of the adjustment spacers are easily accessible and require only a turn of the hex screw to adjust, but the fourth adjustment washer resides underneath the head assembly which needs to be removed in order to access. Again, once adjusted and dialed in, the performance is amazing. There is no lateral slop in the miter slot, and with my hand resting on the table surface using only thumb power, a flick of my thumb launches the gauge to the back of the saw! (“Don’t try this at home folks…”) The nylon pad under the head is a really effective feature. No other gauge I’ve ever used slides anywhere near as well as the Incra. Great design feature. The instructions for making these adjustments are clear with good picture examples. The V27 is extremely easy to use and is very accurate at the prenotched angles. Loosen the AngleLock pointer and the handle, rotate the gauge to the desired notch, and place the pointer firmly back into the form fitting V slot. It’s simple and goof proof as long as you use the 5 degree notch settings provided. The AngleLock pointer sits firmly in the indented V notch for the indexed settings, but for finer increments, the pointer gets backed out of the notch and is consistently skewed from this position and doesn’t lend itself well to precision with the one degree increment makrings. The Incra 1000 and higher models address this issue with an additional plastic vernier pointer which slides back and forth above the indexed notches and points directly at the printed markings on the compass. I added my own version of this pointer using a small piece of mylar that I aligned with the zero reading, and can be pointed more accurately at any 1 degree marking on the gauge much like the more expensive models. It's worth noting that the V27 does not come with it's fence, but it benefits a lot from one. It's not hard to build your own, or add an aftermarket t-slot fence.

Detailed Ratings

4.3
out of 5

Performance

4

Features

4

Ease of Use

4

Value

5

low cost with high accuracy

Review Summary

I got one of these at Rockler when they were on sale for $49.00 and they are absolutely wonderful. The settings are supremely accurate and they lock in place securely so there's no way they can slip out in use. One of the things I really like on these Incra miters is their miter bar. It is very easily adjustable to fit your miter slot accurately and slides smoothly. It's simply designed and you'll probably never be able to wear out the adjustment mechanism in a life time.
I really believe these Incra miters are the best designed on the market today and I love everything they make so far that I own.

Detailed Ratings

5.0
out of 5

Performance

5

Features

5

Ease of Use

5

Value

5

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