Review

The business end of this tool is an extremely sharp and durable 1/2" round solid-carbide cutter.
You use only a small portion of the cutter at any given time (the action is similar to shear-scraping with a round-nose scraper), and when that portion gets dull, you simply loosen the set screw, rotate the cutter a partial turn, and you’re back in business with a sharp edge in just seconds. The Hunter Tool made fast work of hollowing a 10"-diameter, 5"-deep side- grain bowl I turned from spalted soft maple, but I had trouble getting a really fine finish in this soft wood. So I used high-speed steel tools for the fine finish cuts. To see how the carbide cutting edge would hold up, I challenged the Hunter Tool by turning an end-grain lidded box from a chunk of white oak. Even after this punishing task, the cutter appeared to have dulled little, if at all. Without changing tools, I went from rough hollowing cuts to fine finish cuts ready for sanding. The tool excels at hollowing end grain and easily scrapes areas, such as the transition between the bottom and side of an end-grain box, that are difficult to get at with other tools. Although it takes a little practice to find the sweet spot—I found it with the cutter 35°–45° from horizontal— when you do, the tool cuts smoothly and quickly. While certainly not catch-proof, the cutter on the Hunter Carbide Hollowing Tool doesn’t self- feed, so a catch isn’t the disastrous event common with a bowl gouge. When the cutter has made a complete rotation (I figure I’ll get at least six fresh edges), simply replace it. The new cutter costs $20, making the Hunter Tool as wallet-friendly as it is user-friendly, especially for beginning wood turners. —Tested by Jan Svec

Product

Performance

4
Average: 4 (1 vote)

Features

5
Average: 5 (1 vote)

Ease of Use

5
Average: 5 (1 vote)

Value

5
Average: 5 (1 vote)
4.8
out of 5