Hunter Carbide Hollowing Tools

WOOD magazine rating
Average reader rating
4.5
out of 5
Brand:
Hunter Tool Systems
Model:
#4/ #3
Price:
$95

Description

The Hunter Hollowing Tools use a circular carbide cutter inserted into the end of the tool shank. When the tip dulls, just loosen and rotate slightly to a new razor sharp section. The tip is easy to replace when it eventually wears out. No grinding or lapping of the cutter is needed.

Tip wrench and instructions included. Use the #4 Hunter Tool for turning medium sized bowls. 1/2"-diameter cutter is mounted on a 6-1/2" long, 1/2" diameter shank; 24" overall tool length. Use the same tool for rough turning and finishing turning.

WOOD magazine review

The turning tool you'll never sharpen

Review Summary

The business end of this tool is an extremely sharp and durable 1/2" round solid-carbide cutter. You use only a small portion of the cutter at any given time (the action is similar to shear-scraping with a round-nose scraper), and when that portion gets dull, you simply loosen the set screw, rotate the cutter a partial turn, and you’re back in business with a sharp edge in just seconds.
The Hunter Tool made fast work of hollowing a 10"-diameter, 5"-deep side- grain bowl I turned from spalted soft maple, but I had trouble getting a really fine finish in this soft wood. So I used high-speed steel tools for the fine finish cuts. To see how the carbide cutting edge would hold up, I challenged the Hunter Tool by turning an end-grain lidded box from a chunk of white oak. Even after this punishing task, the cutter appeared to have dulled little, if at all. Without changing tools, I went from rough hollowing cuts to fine finish cuts ready for sanding. The tool excels at hollowing end grain and easily scrapes areas, such as the transition between the bottom and side of an end-grain box, that are difficult to get at with other tools. Although it takes a little practice to find the sweet spot—I found it with the cutter 35°–45° from horizontal— when you do, the tool cuts smoothly and quickly. While certainly not catch-proof, the cutter on the Hunter Carbide Hollowing Tool doesn’t self- feed, so a catch isn’t the disastrous event common with a bowl gouge. When the cutter has made a complete rotation (I figure I’ll get at least six fresh edges), simply replace it. The new cutter costs $20, making the Hunter Tool as wallet-friendly as it is user-friendly, especially for beginning wood turners. —Tested by Jan Svec

Detailed Ratings

4.8
out of 5

Performance

4

Features

5

Ease of Use

5

Value

5

Reader Reviews

My first carbide

Review Summary

This was my first carbide tool. Had trouble hollowing with traditional tools and was not the best at sharpening and this was my answer. The tool was the median answer. Being a straight tool and a not very long reach is best for plain style bowls in a shape like half a melon. It can be used on hollowing and other inside shapes, just that it makes hollowing a simple bowl....simple. The tool excels at giving a fine finish cut and with practice will need little sanding.
There is a learning curve to using the tool as the cutter must be angled at 35 to 45 degrees to preventing having a huge catch...yes I have tried that. It is not necessary to cut only in a push cut inside bowl as the cutter design will allow both push and pull cut. The concave shape on the top of the cutter is I believe the sharpest cutter in consumer use and will give long use. Note that on your first cutter you will likely get some chips on the edge due to bad alignment of tool to work....it is a beginner thing. as you learn tool control this will be less of a problem . Just turn the cutter to get a fresh edge. It is difficult to tell when you have rotated the cutter 360 and would be nice to have an engraved mark. I do not rely on this tool as much as I once did due to experience in sharpening and practice in hollowing. However this is still mostly my go to tool for finish cut especially in curly grain or end grain.

Detailed Ratings

4.5
out of 5

Performance

5

Features

4

Ease of Use

4

Value

5

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