Modine Hot Dawg Garage Heater

WOOD magazine rating
Average reader rating
4.8
out of 5
Brand:
Modine Manufacturing
Model:
HD45AS0111
Price:
$755

Description

The gas-fired Hot Dawg offers the following features:

Quiet operation
10 year warranty on heat exchanger
Lightweight, easy installation
Low profile design
Certified for residential, commercial and industrial use
Operates with natural gas or propane

The Hot Dawg is available in both power-exhausted and separated-combustion. The separated-combustion unit offers these additional features:

Draws air from outside for clean and fresh breathing air
Increased seasonal heating efficiency
Greater durability in hostile environments
External gas connections

WOOD magazine review

Take the winter chill off with a HOT DAWG

Review Summary

Over the years, I’ve tried all manner of portable heaters to warm my garage workshop. But none of them worked well enough to provide even heat throughout the shop. Last fall, I installed a Hot Dawg HD45 45,000-Btu, gas-fired heater from Modine, and the world has been a much cozier place ever since. Wired to an inexpensive thermostat, the Hot Dawg maintains a constant temperature all winter long. I set mine at 50°, then bump it up to 68° when I go into the shop to work on a project.
Within about five minutes, I have shirtsleeve weather. At only 12" tall, and requiring only 1" minimum clearance above the unit, the compact Hot Dawg HD45—designed for a 2- to 2-1/2-car garage—tucks in nicely against the ceiling without interfering with garage-door operation. Modine’s larger Hot Dawgs (the 60,000- and 75,000-Btu models) are only 18" tall. Every Hot Dawg heater offers flexibility regarding installation. By merely flipping the unit over, you can put the gas, electric, and flue connections on the left or right. The powered exhaust directs either up through the roof or out through a sidewall. And, you can order your heater to run on either natural gas or propane. One thing I really like about my Hot Dawg is that it doesn’t have a pilot light constantly burning that can ignite solvent fumes. Instead, it uses a hot-surface ignition system that operates only when needed. It's not a sealed combustion chamber, though, so I just shut the unit off at the thermostat before using solvents or solvent-based finishes. —Tested by Dave Campbell

Detailed Ratings

5.0
out of 5

Performance

5

Features

5

Ease of Use

5

Value

5

Reader Reviews

Gas fired Garage Heater for wood workshop

Review Summary

I don't own this brand but one was in my three car garage when I bought the house. One bay, with heater, was made into a workshop and a wall between other bays was erected. My concern has always been: 1. Paints and solvents. I dare not use them when heater is on. 2. Wood dust. Sanding and so forth can create sufficient dust to be a hazard in spite of dust collection.
I use the heater but reserve its use to times when I will not be opening solvents or doing more than just a bit of sanding. Get it warm, turn off the system, including pilot, and do the job. When done and the air is cleared it is time to fire it up again.

Detailed Ratings

4.5
out of 5

Performance

4

Features

4

Ease of Use

5

Value

5

Hot Dawg heat

Review Summary

I tried heating with a torpedo heater in my garage with a carbon monoxide detector always plugged in. Bad idea. I finally had a Hot Dawg heater installed AFTER I insulated the ceiling and walls. Best thing I ever did. Has worked flawlessly for 7 years so far.

Detailed Ratings

5.0
out of 5

Performance

5

Features

5

Ease of Use

5

Value

5

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