Alden Damaged Screw Remover

WOOD magazine rating
Average reader rating
4.0
out of 5
Brand:
Alden Corporation
Model:
#820P
Price:
$14

Description

The Alden Corp 820P Grabit Damaged Screw Remover Bolt Extractor Kit removes damaged screw heads and extracts free-spinning screws. With this kit you can easily remove No. 6 to No. 14 screws from wood, metal or plastic, as well as screws made of any alloy, including soft screws.

WOOD magazine review

Remove Damaged Screws with GraBit

Review Summary

In 30 years of woodworking, I've damaged more screwheads than I can remember. Soft brass screws are the most susceptible, but even the heads of today’s inexpensive steel screws tend to shred under the influence of a cordless drill/driver. Once damaged, you can’t drive ’em in, and often can’t back ’em out. But GraBit screw extractors give you a way to back ’em out.
Each end of the GraBit bit has a different function: The burnishing tip bores and smooths a shallow dimple in the messed-up screwhead. Flip the bit around to expose the reverse-spiral extracting tip; then use your drill/driver, slowly, in reverse. The spiral bites into the dimple, and out comes the screw. The key, I found, is to create a smooth dimple for that spiral to seat in. To test GraBit, I intentionally bunged up a Phillips-head brass hinge screw so badly, I even couldn't see where the drive slots had been. Surprisingly, the burnishing/ extracting process worked exactly as advertised. In fact, no matter what kind of screw I tried it on—steel screws, drywall screws, brass screws, Phillips, slotted or square drive—GraBit worked in them all. The 2-piece set works on screws from size #6 to #14, and should be in every woodworker’s toolbox. The manufacturer suggests not using GraBit on screws longer than 2". Such screws provide more resistance than the extracting tip can overcome. —Tested by Pat Lowry

Detailed Ratings

4.5
out of 5

Performance

5

Features

4

Ease of Use

4

Value

5

Reader Reviews

mostly works

Review Summary

I purchased this tool a few years go at the IWF wood show and have used it a few times since. It works better on softer screws like brass and regular metal screws , but I haven't had that much luck using it on the screws with a hardened head like drywall screws, even so I still think this is a good investment and a better alternative to drilling out the screw with one of those a hollow drill bits on the market.

Detailed Ratings

4.0
out of 5

Performance

4

Features

4

Ease of Use

4

Value

4

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