Senco 15-Gauge Cordless Nailer

WOOD magazine rating
Brand:
Senco
Model:
FN65DA
Price:
$400

Description

The F-15 features Fusion technology and has plenty of power and the utility of a pneumatic tool combined with the convenience of a cordless tool. Our patented reflex-shot design provides an instant shot when the trigger is pulled with no ramp up time. Save up to $300 a year by not having to buy any fuel cells.

* Patented re-flex shot design
* Robust aluminum drive cylinder
* Nose-mounted LED light
* Innovative EZ clear feature
* Selectable drive switch
* Thumbwheel depth of drive
* Adjustable belt hook

WOOD magazine review

Is it cordless? Is it pneumatic? Yes—it's both

Review Summary

Senco’s Fusion 15-gauge, angled finish nailer eliminates the two biggest hassles common to other nailers: cumbersome air hoses and stinky fuel cells. This model uses an 18-volt, lithium-ion battery-powered motor that retracts the driver piston and compresses the air behind it. Pulling the trigger releases the piston, driving the fastener. And it does all this in a package that weighs a little more than 6 pounds.
I used the Fusion F15 to install wainscoting on my stairwell, and quickly appreciated how nimble it is. The nose pinpoints nail placement with clear visibility thanks to an LED light. It won’t bump-fire as quickly as my pneumatic nailers, but I found it plenty quick enough. And for clearing nail jams, the entire magazine comes off with the release of a lever. (The nailer never jammed on me, but it’s good to know there’s an easy fix if it should.) The F15 comes with one battery, and it drives 330 nails per charge. But you must remove the battery pack from the tool or turn the firing-mode selector switch to its “off” position to avoid depleting the battery when sitting idle overnight. The 15-gauge nails have lots of holding power but leave larger holes than I’d like. —Tested by Kevin Boyle

Detailed Ratings

4.5
out of 5

Performance

5

Features

5

Ease of Use

5

Value

3

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