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November 2016

Issue Number: 243

Mackintosh-style Occasional Table

November 2016 Page: 26

This table is an interpretation of one Charles Rennie Mackintosh designed for Hill House in Helensburgh, Scotland, ca. 1904. Though not as well known in America as Stickley or Roycroft, Mackintosh (1868-1928) was an important figure in the European Arts & Crafts movement. His work encompassed both architecture and furniture. The through-mortises and crisp, square cutouts may look diffiult, but they really are quite easy. The secret to success is in a careful glue-up.

Plan is available in the WOOD Store

Wood Store

Mackintosh-style Occasional Table Woodworking Plan

This table is an interpretation of one Charles Rennie Mackintosh designed for Hill House in Helensburgh, Scotland, ca. 1904. Though not as well known in America as Stickley or Roycroft, Mackintosh (1868-1928) was an important figure in the European Arts & Crafts movement. His work encompassed both architecture and furniture. The through-mortises and crisp, square cutouts may look diffiult, but they really are quite easy. The secret to success is in a careful glue-up.

Featured in
WOOD Issue 243, November 2016

10.11.2016 | Wood Product
Wood Store

Zigzag Box Woodworking Plan

For visual impact, it's hard to beat this box. A perpetual pattern tracing around all sides fascinates the eye. Alternating shades of cherry and walnut create the illusion of corners extending toward and away from you. Quilted mapleäóîif you can obtain someäóîenhances the effect. Lift the lid, and you'll find the pattern inside the box, too. Even with all these angles, you'll enjoy straightforward construction.

Featured in
WOOD Issue 243, November 2016

10.11.2016 | Wood Product

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