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Chatoyant Box

Light can sometimes play tricks on your eyesäóîand this box proves that axiom. By gluing up panels covered in 3/4"-square cherry veneer tilesäóîevery other one turned 90ŒÁäóîlight catches each alternating tile's grain differently. The changing reflective pattern gives this project a compelling and unique look. But don't be intimidated by its seeming complexity; building it just requires a lot of repetition as you cut, tape, and glue each tile, then repeat.

Featured in
WOOD Issue 250, November 2017

01.18.2018 | Wood Product
Wood Store

Waxing Nostalgic Barn Lantern

Combine oak and copper in a rustic candle holder. Reader Damon Vincent designed this lantern based on one he spotted while visiting Germany. Don't let the metal parts put you off; copper works easily and full-size patterns will guide you.

Featured in
WOOD Issue 251, December/January 2017/2018

01.18.2018 | Wood Product
Wood Store

The Fastest Cabinet You'll Ever Build

The secret to building a cabinet lickety-split? It's not one thing, but a series of choices regarding materials, joinery, part sizing, and methods of work, each providing efficiency and saving time. Senior Design Editor Kevin Boyle has built dozens of cabinets using the approach shown here. If you read and understand the process before you get into the shop, you'll be amazed how quickly a cabinet comes together.

Featured in
WOOD Issue 251, December/January 2017/2018

01.18.2018 | Wood Product
Wood Store

Illuminated Curio Cabinet

Inside, glass shelves let light shine from top to bottom. Outside, careful grain selection and three-way miters show off your woodworking skills. A simple plywood carcase and doors with identically sized rails and stiles make this cabinet come together quickly.

Featured in
WOOD Issue 250, November 2017

01.18.2018 | Wood Product
Wood Store

Family Message Center

Keep communications clear in your household by writing or sticking notes on this attractive message board. The shelf and hooks help organize phones, keys, jackets, and more.

Featured in
WOOD Issue 250, November 2017

01.18.2018 | Wood Product
Wood Store

Platform Bed

This modern beauty is a breeze to make. You won't give up a thing in the looks department by using well-chosen southern yellow pine instead of hardwood for this queen-size sleeper. Or how about this? Replace the glued-up headboard with a natural-edge slab for a one-of-a-kind showpiece.

Featured in
WOOD Issue 251, December/January 2017/2018

01.18.2018 | Wood Product
Wood Store

Iron Age Display Shelf

Blend classic wood shelves with steel legs for an industrial, yet refined contemporary look. You'll need no fancy metalworking tools or special skills to create the legs, just a drill, hacksaw and a bit of elbo grease. A grinder and a countersink designed for cutting steel come in handy, but aren't essential.

Featured in
WOOD Issue 251, December/January 2017/2018

01.18.2018 | Wood Product
Wood Store

Bench-mounted Router Table

Save the precious floor space you'd devote to a typical router table by making this model that clamps to the edge of a bench. You still get built-in storage for bits, wrenches and push pads, and a fully adjustable fence with dust collection and sliding faces that reduce tear-out when routing. When you finish routing, stow the table away for full use of your bench. Building it requires less than one sheet of 1/2" plywood.

Featured in
WOOD Issue 251, December/January 2017/2018

01.18.2018 | Wood Product
Wood Store

Make a Mallet (or Two)

The best mallet you'll ever use may be as close as your scrap bin. You need only two pieces of hardwoodäóîwe used maple for the head and hickory for the handle. The handle locks into a wedge-shaped mortise for a fit that tightens with use. Build the smaller mallet for light assembly work and for use with 1"-and-narrower chisels. The larger version gives you more striking power with big chisels and provides greater "persuasion" with tight-fitting furniture and cabinetry joints. You can, of course, make an even smaller mallet for fine, delicate work, or bigger for framed structures.

01.18.2018 | Wood Product

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