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A Guide to Hammers

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Dead-blow Hammer and Wooden Mallet

Dead-blow Hammer and Wooden Mallet

Dead-blow hammer: a solid hitter with a gentle touch

The dead-blow hammer's hollow head, filled with steel shot, delivers a solid blow without rebounding. Some dead-blow hammers feature replaceable steel or plastic faces. For woodworking, however, we prefer a 14-oz. urethane-encapsulated type, shown at left.

The resilient covering, coupled with the no-bounce hit, minimizes surface marring when you use this hammer against wood. There's no better tool for tapping joints together or knocking them apart. You usually won't have to take mighty swings with this hammer, which also prevents damage to project parts.


Use a dead-blow hammer for:
  • Assembling/disassembling joints.
  • Aligning parts.
  • Setting dowels or splines.
  • Adjusting/tuning tools.

Don't use it for:
  • Striking chisels.
  • Driving nails or other fasteners.
  • Hitting sharp objects that could damage the covering.

Wooden mallet: your best bet for striking a chisel

If you own woodworking chisels, you need a wooden mallet like the one shown at left. It's the tool best suited to driving chisels.

The mallet's large, flat, angled faces ensure that you?ll hit the chisel squarely every time. Hitting the end of a chisel with a nail hammer's small face calls for unerring aim and concentration-which means you end up watching the top of the chisel handle when you should be paying attention to the sharp end. (A steel hammer head can clobber up a wooden chisel handle pretty badly, too.)


Count on a wooden mallet for:
  • Striking woodworking chisels--the tool's main purpose.
  • Assembling or disassembling joints.
  • Aligning parts.

Don't use it for:
  • Striking anything metal or sharp.

Continued on page 3:  Commonsense Hints For Hammering

 

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Comments (2)
8327913637
rudolph.ken wrote:

Use an engineers hammer (ballpein) to strike anything harder than a wire nail. Carpentry hammers are harder and can shatter. I was in hospital one time with a diesel fitter who lost one eye knocking in his sons tricycle cotter pin. Please be careful.

2/2/2013 03:37:38 PM Report Abuse
stephenrreisi wrote:

You forgot to add the photos of the hammers in these three pages.

1/31/2013 10:48:57 AM Report Abuse

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