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Staves and Segments

Staved or segmented construction figures in a lot of projects, from ornamental bowl turnings to porch pillars. A question we often hear is: What miter angle (or bevel) do I need? Another recurring question is: How long (or wide) should I make the pieces? Finding those answers is relatively easy. Here s how to do the math.

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Staves and Segments
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Staves and Segments

Staved or segmented construction figures in a lot of projects, from ornamental bowl turnings to porch pillars. A question we often hear is: What miter angle (or bevel) do I need? Another recurring question is: How long (or wide) should I make the pieces? Finding those answers is relatively easy. Here s how to do the math.

First, let's get our terminology straight. Staved cylinders and segmented rings may seem alike, but they're two different breeds of cats. As shown in the Staved Cylinder and Segmented Ring illustrations, the individual pieces in a segmented ring are miter-cut (shown in the Segment illustration) and joined at the ends. In a staved cylinder, the component parts are bevel-cut (shown in the Stave illustration) and joined edge-to-edge.


stave-segment_graindirection

So, things can become confusing when we start talking about the distance between the angles. On a stave that distance is the width, but on a segment, it's the length. For this article, we'll refer always to length. Substitute "width" if you're cutting staves.

Also for simplicity, we'll call the angled cuts miters, even though we know they may be either miters or bevels. Note, too, that this article only covers straight-sided cylinders or flat rings. Tapered cylinders or rings with sloped sides call for compound cuts.


Continued on page 2:  What's Your Angle?

 

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Comments (6)
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wood-fog wrote:

I like the fact that you are trying to help us, but, for my limited education, I find your method tedious. I was taught that because you are finding the miter angle to cut.finding the corner angle is a waste of time. Just divide the number of sides into 180 degrees (1/2 of the circle)

1/19/2010 10:19:56 AM Report Abuse
louis Hansen wrote:

very useful info Thanks

1/8/2010 08:25:07 PM Report Abuse
pshelp1 wrote:

I DON,T UNDERSTAND THE SEGMENTATIONS ON MY LATHE CHUCK WHAT IS THAT FOR?

1/7/2010 04:38:28 PM Report Abuse
davidmpitts wrote:

The glue-up can be fairly straight forward as well. Just lay all of the staves edge to edge and bevel down. Then tape the edges together so that when you glue them up the tape will act like a hinge. Then use some thick rubber bands or some band clamps to hold it while the glue dries.

1/7/2010 12:54:55 PM Report Abuse
cowanbryan wrote:

I dont have a problem with the angles its the glue up that baffles me

1/7/2010 10:25:01 AM Report Abuse
maurice bedard wrote:

For more information on stave bowl construction you can refer to Wood magazine issue 23. It's loaded with helpful hints and ideas.

1/7/2010 09:58:44 AM Report Abuse

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