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Drive screws that don't corrode

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Driving lessons
3 screws tips
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The design of these three
tips helps prevent splits on
board ends that aren't predrilled.
4 heads of screw
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Screws with star- and square-drive
recesses resist stripping better than
Phillips-drive recesses, and they
outperform screws with combination
Phillips/square-drive recesses.

Driving lessons

When driving screws in hard materials, such as PT lumber or hardwoods, opt for a screw in the largest gauge available. For example, many outlets carry 3" deck screws in #8 gauge, but you'll experience fewer snapped screws if you spend a few extra bucks for #10 screws.

If you plan to drive deck screws near the ends of boards without predrilling, look for a fastener with an auger, serrated, or fluted point, such as the ones shown in top photo. In our tests, these screws were less likely to split the wood. Serrated and fluted screws proved noticeably easier to drive when using long screws in hard materials.

Square-drive and star-drive (also called Torx) recesses grip driver bits better than Phillips head or combination Phillips/square recesses do. (See bottom photo.) In our tests we found it difficult to strip out a square- or star-drive recess or do serious damage to their coatings. Phillips recesses strip out occasionally, and combination recesses, although handy, strip out excessively.

For a free downloadable screw chart, go to: woodmagazine.com/screwchart


 

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Comments (1)
8497457984
paul_probus wrote:

There is a bit made to drive the Philips/Square combo that just about eliminates the stripping of those combo drives. I only find them located in the HW area where the screws are, of the big box stores, don't look for it over where they have the bits in the Tools section.

8/7/2014 11:03:20 AM Report Abuse

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