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Idea Shop 6, Paycheck 4: Teach an Old Drill New Tricks

Idea Shop 6Jigs such as your straightline cutting guides and crosscutting jig help you work more accurately. With this check, you’ll add that kind of accuracy to your cordless drill, and outfit it to do a job you may not have thought about: Read more

Idea Shop 6, Paycheck 3: Get on Your High Horse

Idea Shop 6Working on the floor takes a toll on the knees and back. With this check, you build a pair of sawhorses to elevate your work. When the job is done, the sawhorses fold flat for storage.

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Idea Shop 6, Paycheck 2: Guidance is Needed

Idea Shop 6The straightedge guides made earlier work well for cutting sheet goods to size, but are far too bulky to cut stick lumber to length. To accomplish that, build this simple crosscut guide that provides dead-on accuracy.

 

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Idea Shop 6, Paycheck 1: Start Off on the Straight and Narrow

Idea Shop 6With your shop site assessed and basic tool kit gathered as described in the first post, the first payday has arrived and you have $150 ready to start building a shop. So without any woodworking-specific tools (yet), where do you start? Simple. Read more

Welcome to Idea Shop 6 – Built on a Budget

So the woodworking bug bit hard, and now you want a nice space to build more stuff. But setting up a fully outfitted shop can be expensive and confusing. Not any longer. As described in issue 238 [March 2016] of WOOD®, we will show you exactly how to set up a shop by working within a budget of $150 every two weeks over 26 pay periods. On that modest amount, you can take an empty space such as the one shown below, and transform it into a full-on woodworking shop, outfitted with quality tools, accessories, jigs, and fixtures. You’ll see immediate results, building things with your new tools right from the start.

Idea Shop 6 before:

 

 Idea Shop 6:

 

 

To coincide with each paycheck’s budgeted $150, we’ll provide in this blog, links to related articles, plans, and videos. To get an email reminder of that posting, sign up for our newsletter by clicking here: woodmagazine.com/newsletter.

The next four posts will outline what to do with your first four budgeted amounts. Because not all of the money gets spent each two weeks, bank the leftover cash for purchasing big-ticket items such as a tablesaw, planer, and jointer. We will recommend good-quality tools but, because this is a budget-based shop, they may not be class-leading. If you can afford more than the budget (or already own some of the items listed), put that extra money towards upgraded tools. Find tool evaluations to guide your choices on ReviewATool.com. At its core, Idea Shop 6 is less about the specific items in it, and more about how to create a workable shop, over time, without breaking the bank.

The first step to setting up a woodworking shop is evaluating your shop site for spaceelectrical needs and wiring, and comfort. As you address any needs in those areas, you can still get started with purchases for your shop. You should have on hand your basic tool kit, described below, or order any missing tools.

Ya Gotta Start Somewhere

You likely already own the tools shown below. If you don’t, acquiring them will cost only about $150, so just tack one more two-week period onto the year. You’ll need them mainly to assemble stationary tools, but the hearing and eye protection, tape measure, and extension cord will be needed from the get-go. Purchase any or all of these items in one fell swoop, and have them delivered to your door: woodmagazine.com/is6basickit.

The recommended basic tool kit includes: Wrench set (metric and imperial), pliers, hacksaw, hex-key set (metric and imperial), safety glasses, ratchet and socket set (metric and imperial), 12′ or 16′ tape measure, screwdrivers (Phillips and slotted), 12-gauge extension cord or power strip, hammer.

In the next post, with your first $150 in hand, you’ll start outfitting your shop.

Curious about Idea Shops 1–5?

Our previous Idea Shops are packed full of ideas including tool stands, innovative storage solutions, tool organizers and more. Here are the issues of WOOD in which each appeared. See highlights, including floorplans with tool placement, at woodmagazine.com/ideashops.

Idea Shop, 14×28′ shed, issue 54 (September 1992)

 

Idea Shop 2, 24×24′ two-car garage, issue 72 (September 1994)

 

Idea Shop 3, 12×16′ basement room, issue 100 (November 1997)

 

Idea Shop 2000, 12×20′ outbuilding, issue 119 (December 1999)

 

Idea Shop 5, 15×22′ garage stall, issue 151 (October 2003)

 

 

Transitional Plane Alternatives

When it comes to planes, I’m a firm believer in “the more the merrier” philosophy. So for the transitional plane project from the September 2015 issue of WOOD (Issue #234) I put the philosophy into practice by mixing up the wood species. Be sure to send a picture of your version to woodmail@woodmagazine.com.

First the original from the article in figured walnut and maple.

 

Next a version in white oak and maple:

 

And one in bubinga and quilted maple:

 

And finally, cherry and bocote:

 

Thanks for looking! John

 

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Bosch develops tablesaw with blade-brake safety

For over a decade SawStop has gained dominance in the tablesaw market with its unique flesh-sensing, blade-stopping safety mechanism. And until now, no other manufacturer has had any similar technology on the market to compete with that. Today Bosch announced it will launch this fall Reaxx, a 10″ job-site tablesaw with a flesh-sensing blade-drop safety mechanism. It will sell for $1,499 (MSRP). I got a sneak peek at this saw in action during a media event hosted by Bosch in February, but could not officially comment on it until now. It’s quite impressive. To see the saw in action, watch this video provided by Bosch (note: turn down the volume).

The key to Bosch’s safe saw is a device that uses similar technology that Bosch’s auto-parts division uses to deploy air bags in automobiles. (Nice to have sibling companies sharing technology.) With this saw, when the blade senses a finger (or any flesh), the device fires a cartridge that immediately and oh-so-speedily drops the blade completely below the table surface, leaving the user with only a slight scrape or skin nick. Unlike SawStop—which ruins both blade and brake cartridge—the Bosch flesh-detecting Active Response Technology kills the power and lets the blade coast to a stop safely within the cabinet, preserving it for future use. After activation, the system can be reset in less than 60 seconds. The brake cartridge has two “activation” cells, so all you do is flip it over and use the other after an activation. Replacement cartridges will cost about $100. More good news: This safety device works for dado sets as well as 10″ blades—no need for separate cartridges. All necessary parts, instructions and wrenches are located onboard the saw, including storage for extra activation cartridges.

An electronic control module with four colored lights not only turns the saw on and off, but also gives you helpful input as to the saw’s state of readiness:

• Green means the saw is ready for use.

• Yellow means the system is set in bypass mode by the operator; this mode is used for cutting conductive materials that could potentially activate the Active Response Technology system. In addition, there’s no override key to lose or misplace, yet it still offers various lock-out options to prevent unauthorized bypass mode operation.

• Red means the saw is not ready and will not function until the user corrects an issue.

• Blue means the saw requires service from a Bosch-authorized technician.

A smartphone app allows you to program and lock out some of these features, helpful if you want to limit who can bypass the safety mode or operate the saw when you don’t want.

The 15-amp motor spins the blade at 3,650 rpm.

—Bob Hunter, Tools Editor, WOOD Magazine

 

 

 

 

DETROIT 2015 – A SHOWCASE TO REMEMBER

 

The Woodworking Show traveled to Novi, Michigan this last weekend, February 13-15, and opened to a nice sized crowd on Friday. Some pretty rotten weather (snow and wind chills near 30 below zero is my definition of rotten) only slightly dampened attendance but not enthusiasm on Saturday and Sunday. Add  the fact that there was an ongoing gun and knife show in the next hall, we proved to have some of the most dedicated woodworkers of the season by far.

Our attendees certainly came for all the education and our vendors but they brought along something for us to see in return. We had the largest and most diverse Project Showcase to date with 22 entries including some from our younger talent in the Youth Division. It has always been very encouraging for me to see people becoming comfortable enough with their abilities to be willing to share their work and allow it to be judged by other attendees and our educators. I have talked about, to the point of preaching I’m sure, that your work is better than you give yourselves credit for so it was really nice to see that maybe some of our woodworkers are beginning to believe it.

As you’ve probably seen in this blog, I post the pictures of the winning entries each week during the show series and I’ll continue to do that. But there are always those entries that just miss the cut that go unheralded. Here are a few from this last weekend.

An excellent example of a turned box with a pyrographic embellishment.

A fully functional spinning wheel.

A good reason not to look for a lost ball in a water hazard.

An interesting keepsake box.

Dinner time!

 

For the projects that did have that certain extra, we did have some awards. In the Youth Division, in which the judging was very close, the award for Best Finish went to Sawyer Hill for “Thor’s Hammer”. Sawyer took home a bag of Bessey tools donated by the Chidwick School.

Best Workmanship went to Joe Kollaritsch for his “Turned Goblet” (I lost the image, so sorry) and he received a gift card from Lee Valley Tools.

The Most Creative and overall People’s and Educator’s Choice awards went to Danielle Roberts for her “Wall-E” carving. She won the Bessey Tool bag and a Lee Valley Gift card for her efforts.

In the Adult Division, Best Finish and Educator’s Choice went to a beautiful “Crimson Whorl Vessel” by Alfred Schembri and he received his choice of a Bosch tool.

Best Workmanship and overall People’s Choice award winner was Richard Tocco’s “Miniature Furniture”. This amazing collection of miniatures took Richard the better part of 10 years to complete. Unfortunately, pictures just couldn’t do justice to his efforts. I’m sure that the Bosch tool he selected as his prize will be well used and appreciated.

The Most Creative award went to Thomas Balogh for his “Taliesen Lamp” and he also took home a Bosch tool.

On Sunday, we left the frigid temperatures of Detroit and will head to the east coast where the snow has really taken hold. We will again set up shop in Somerset, New Jersey at the Garden State Exhibit Center. Our years of using that venue have made it quite familiar to area woodworkers and I’m anticipating a really great shew, as Ed Sullivan would surely have said had he been a woodworker. You can bet that we will come with our game on and hope that our attendees will do as they did in Detroit and fill that Project Showcase with their best efforts. Find some time in your weekend to visit us. You won’t be disappointed. And, let’s see what you’ve got.

‘Til then, I’ll see you on the road.

Jim Heavey

WOOD Magazine Traveling Ambassador

A TALE OF TWO CITIES-CALIFORNIA STYLE

 

When the Woodworking Shows made their swing through California these last two weeks, October 31-November 9, I took the opportunity to stay out on the road and drive from Costa Mesa to Sacramento. I made the trip with an old friend, Rollie Johnson, and Bradley McCalister who teaches wood turning each weekend. Read more

CRAFTSY CLASS LAUNCH

 

Well, the end of Summer is near. We even had snow flurries last week. It won’t be long but I’ll be back on the road for the Woodworking Shows. We start the season in Houston on October 24th at the Lone Star Convention & Expo Center in Conroe, TX.  The show hiatus went by so quickly!

I was able to get out to Des Moines this last July and do a bit of work in the WOOD shop. In a collaboration with WOOD Magazine and Craftsy (a producer of online educational classes) we filmed a class on making cabinets and drawers. This turned out to be an extension of the presentations I did last season on the woodworking circuit. These indepth lessons became Drawer Construction for Cabinetry and Fine Furniture. This class launched today! you can check out my class and take 50% off with this link. http://www.craftsy.com/ext/JimHeavey_4800_H

 

 

I’m really proud to have been part of this project. The taping spanned almost 5 full days and we were able to cover much more material in far greater depth than we could have ever accomplished in a woodworking show setting. Its also nice for me to watch these videos and see how young I was. After all, it’s been almost 3 months  and I was taller, thinner and had darker hair ….

Stay well everyone. Hope you’ll see me on film. Hope I’ll catch you at a Woodworking Show.

‘Til then,

I’ll see you on the road.

Jim Heavey

WOOD Magazine Traveling Ambassador

 
 
 
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