Home > Community > Blogs > After Hours with the WOOD Gang
Better Blog

wood

Finding Urban Lumber

Once upon a time, the path from tree to lumber mill to craftsman and, ultimately, the end user was rarely more than 50 miles. Nowadays, that path often covers a distance spanning half the globe. But it doesn’t have to be that way. You may have a ready source of materials right in your immediate area. Read more

Categories: wood | Tags:
1 Comment

SHORT BUT SWEET IN KC

 

 

Kansas City in March can always be a bit of a gamble when it comes to the weather and we experienced that phenomenon this last weekend, February 28-March 2, when the Woodworking Shows opened its doors at the Kemper Arena at noon on Friday according to schedule but closed them two hours shy of normal on Sunday. Conditions went from the sunny 40′s for my arrival on Thursday to near single digits and blowing snow for late Saturday and all day Sunday. I’m not one to complain (I do enjoy each season) but I think it’s about  time to strangle that groundhog in Pennsylvania. Metaphorically, of course!

As is my custom each weekend, I did take my normal side trip to see something of interest on Thursday. Having seen the Jazz Museum, The Negro Leagues Baseball Museum, and an underground Minuteman silo on previous visits, I found the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art to be the perfect stop. Why this museum isn’t just jammed with visitors, I’ll never understand. There were very few people there when I went  despite the fact that admittance is free (they really appreciate donations though) and the art and the buildings themselves are so impressive. The grounds and outdoor sculpture art were an enticement even as I drove up. The neighborhood has some very interesting buildings as well. Coupling this with some great displays of period art and furniture including a very inviting courtyard for lunch, made this museum a real winner for me.

 

We had some very nice crowds of woodworkers who packed the entryway and the aisles on Friday and Saturday. With the threat of additional snow and really poor driving conditions predicted for Sunday, that day’s crowds were somewhat sparse. For those who did attend, they found an even larger show than last year with more tool vendors and educational opportunities. This was the second year at the Kemper Arena and even though there is a small parking fee, most attendees were excited to see the show’s expansion. As has been the case this last year in general, we are seeing somewhat younger attendees and quite a few children.

I stopped by many of the booths to chat with the vendors and clubs. I was particularly drawn by the interest and busyness of the Kansas City Woodturners Club. It seemed like there was something happening everywhere and constantly. Some great projects on display too.

Representatives from the DNR spent the weekend educating people about the various invasive bug species and their potential harm to the trees in the area.

I saw a very interesting Bishop Clamp system on display at the Bushton Mfg booth.

We had each of our Project Showcase categories covered this weekend with some very unique and well constructed entries.

The Youth Division had entries from two brothers take the honors with second place going to Jeremiah Stalder’s Rubber Band Gun and his brother, Daniel, taking first with a spinning top.

For the adults in the Furniture Category, a third place ribbon went to Caleb Schraeder’s Arch Entry Table. Ronald Lomax took second for the Sculpted Stool and Hal Jones’s Cradle took top honors.

In Turnings, Jim Ramsey was the overall winner with his Table Lamp with Turned Pendulum.

Models/Toys winner was the Fire Engine by Jerry Ray.

In the Open Category, Brian Dillon took first place for his Kayak. Brian was the winner of both the People’s Choice and Educator’s Choice as well. A clean sweep for that beautiful watercraft.

All of our entrants won a goody bag from the Woodworking Shows and category winners took home tools from Bosch Tools, Worksharp and Lee Valley gift cards. Brian’s Kayak will complete with the other Educator’s Choice winners for the grand prize at the conclusion of the Woodworking Show season in March.

The snowy conditions forced the show to close early on Sunday but that gave our intrepid road crews a little extra time to truck everything to our next venue in Norcross, Georgia at the North Atlantic Trade Center. We will be there from March 7-9 and, as of this writing, without any snow in the forecast. Maybe ‘ol Punxsutawney Phil knows he’s on thin ice! If you get a chance to see the show, I hope you’ll stop in at the WOOD Magazine booth for our seminars on Cabinet Making. I’ll make it worth your while.

‘Til then, I’ll see you on the road.

Jim Heavey

WOOD Magazine Traveling Ambassador

FOUR DAYS IN DENVER

Traveling for WOOD Magazine to the Woodworking shows can be quite an adventure at times. The rain that was ever present in Portland two weeks ago turned out to be the precursor of the snow storm that greeted my arrival in the mile high city last weekend, November 21-24.

Temperatures that never got out of the low teens on Thursday made for a rough transition for someone who wasn’t quite ready for this early blast of winter. It may not be Thanksgiving yet but I can almost hear those sleigh bells ring-a-ling-ing.

The show at the Denver Merchandise Mart opened to really big crowds of woodworkers and they eagerly took their places in the various educational seminar areas. In addition to the classes run by our weekly team of instructors, Mark Adams returned for the first time in a few years to teach cabinet making and routers as paid seminars in a separate part of the show floor. In years past, these paid seminars were a mainstay of the show circuit and featured more intensive 3 hour classes in contrast to the free 45 minute classes we currently offer. Those who attended Mark’s class felt the  additional cost was well worth it. Mark will be present at more shows beginning this winter. Check the Woodworking Shows website for dates and class content.

Woodworking clubs and Red Rocks Community College were on hand to display the work of their members and instructors. Pete Jones, instructor at Red Rock, proudly displayed this beautiful bench. A guitar on display looked ready to play. The hollow vessel from the Front Range Woodturners was very well done.

One of the vendors, Legacy CNC, had a very cool machined stool and lidded container as examples of just a couple of the possibilities their tools and software are capable of making.

The only way to get an unobstructed view of the True Track system was before the show opened. The booth seemed busy every time I went by there.

I was a bit disappointed and yet, at the same time,  very excited by the entries at the Project Showcase this last weekend. For all the big crowds of attendees, I expected more than just the few projects that were submitted for judging but the quality of those projects were easily some of the best of the season to date. Only two of our categories were represented. In the Open Category, first place went to Scott Roth’s Marquetry Piece. He took home a Boch Tool and a show goody bag for his efforts.

In the Furniture Category, third place ribbons went to Bob Amador for his Heirloom Rocker. Second place was a very unique Lingerie Chest by Rich Gady. First place and a Bosch tool went to Art Brazee for his interpretation of a Krenov Cabinet. In our closest contest yet, the award for People’s Choice went to Art Brazee and he also received a Drill Doctor by Work Sharp. The Educator’s Choice was the Lingerie Chest by Rich Gady. Rich will go on to the Grand Prize judging at the end of the season and he also will take home a Knife and Tool Sharpening System from Work Sharp as well as subscriptions to WOOD Magazine and Fine Woodworking.

The Woodworking Shows will go on a brief hiatus for the holidays and will ring in the new year in Baltimore at the Maryland State Fairgrounds on January 3-5, 2014. I can’t believe it’ll be 2014! This is always a very large show so advance registering will be a really good idea. Besides, you’ll save a couple of bucks and get a jump start on the lines by doing it.

While the shows may be taking a break, I will be in the Tampa area on December 7 speaking at the St. Petersburg Woodworking Guild. Not only are these a great bunch of like minded woodworkers but Florida in December is nothing to sneeze at either.

Here’s hoping that you have a very Happy Thanksgiving and a great holiday season. Enjoy the time with friends and family and make a trip to your shop. It’s never too late to make something special for someone special. Let’s hear those sleigh bells ring-a-ling!

‘Til then, I’ll see you on the road.

Jim Heavey

WOOD Magazine Traveling Ambassador

Categories: wood | Tags:
No Comments

TOO SHORT A STAY IN PORTLAND

 

Just as an old story line says if it’s Tuesday it must be Sweden, for me if it’s Thursday I must be flying to somewhere. The Woodworking Shows will have at least 16 of those Thursdays this season and, I must admit, they all seem like a blur at times. This last weekend however, November 14-17, was in one of those cities in perfect focus. Portland Oregon has to be a favorite for me because of its mountains, forests, waterways and eclectic downtown.

Even the nearly continual chance of rain, something that gives this area its vibrancy and beauty, is almost invigorating for me. A long Thursday of exploring eventually gives way to Friday, the opening of our show and the fun of seeing excited woodworkers ready to spend the rest of their weekend with us. Not a bad reason to be on the road. Having a nice coffee break with an old friend at the show doesn’t hurt either.

The doors were jammed on that Friday and the crowd filled the show floor until just before closing time. That would be our best day as there were less attendees on the following two days though still a good weekend over all for the educators and vendors. Jet Tools and Hammer as well as Lee Valley saw a lot of interest in stationary and hand tools. Bosch had both corporate and retail booths and dozens of others had jigs, templates, fences and clamps on display as well. Plenty to see and purchase from the retailers.

The local woodworking and carving clubs were here too and garnered a lot of interest. The Columbia River Chapter of the American Marquetry Society had a great interpretation of Multnomah Falls (a favorite Thursday stopover) and other pieces from their members.

 The Guild of Oregon Woodworkers displayed a pretty cool old classic with a rumble seat to boot and a very unique horizontal pin router.

 

I’m sure I saw that Rainbow trout earlier in the week and in its past life before it graced the Western Woodcarvers Association booth.

We had a very nice assortment of entries at the Project Showcase this last weekend and a chance to recognize our largest number of entries to date. The winners took home gift cards from Lee Valley, Subscriptions to WOOD Magazine as well as Fine Woodworking, Work Sharp tools and Drill Doctor, and of course, a variety of Bosch Tools, our Showcase sponsor. Chris Dayton took first place with his chair in the youth division, followed closely by Fernando Hernandez’s Sofa Table. Chris also won both the People’s Choice and Educator’s Choice awards.

In the Adult Division, Mike Rohrbach took first with his Cat Scraper beating out the School Bus from Robert Oswald in Models/Toys.

In the Open Category, Dennis Kincaid (Backgammon Board), Theo Hardy (Baritone Guitar) and Wade Sims (Wine Clock) took 1st, 2nd and 3rd respectively.

In Furniture, not only did Richard Babbitt take first place with his Round Foyer Table, edging out Willie Sandry and son Cherry Trundle Bed, but also swept the People’s Choice as well as the Editor’s Choice awards. He also will be entered into the grand prize contest at the end of this season.

 A good weekend for everyone, especially Richard!

Next weekend, November 22-24, we’ll be in Denver at the Denver Merchandise Mart.  As in the past, this promises to be a very well attended, busy woodworking show. If you get a chance, stop in. I’m sure you’ll find something that interests you and a whole lot more. Get your tickets on line to save a couple of bucks and time at the gates when you get there.  I’m in the WOOD magazine booth and we’re talking about Cabinet Construction. You’ll want to pull up a chair. I’ve got a lot to show you.

I left Portland yesterday in a light mist (what else is new) after a Sunday night dinner downtown. The perfect end to a perfect weekend. I left with a heavy heart and heavy suitcase. Most everything in there was wet. Ah, Portland! Gotta love it!

’til then, I’ll see you on the road.

Jim Heavey

WOOD Magazine Traveling Ambassador

Categories: wood | Tags:
1 Comment

WE’RE BACK IN TEXAS

 

Last weekend, October 25-27, The Woodworking Shows returned to the great state of Texas. The late sale of the show in 2012 kept our new owner from securing venues for the Fall portion of the show circuit last year and we were left, sadly, with nothing to do until January. Hope springs eternal and now we’re back with a mix of the things that you’ve grown accustom to. Read more

Categories: wood | Tags:
No Comments

An innovator passes

As the editors at WOOD were reviewing woodworking tools in preparation for our Innov8 Awards in the Dec/Jan issue, we learned of the passing of Burt Weinstein, inventor and founder of Simp’l Products. You may not recognize the name, but Burt came up with several tools for woodworkers, such as the Jointer Clamp Dow’l It, and a simple pocket-hole jig. Several years ago, Burt sold his company to General Tools, but he remained active with GT, inventing and promoting his products.

Burt Weinstein, 1926-2013

Burt was 72 when I first met him 15 years ago when I started at WOOD magazine, and he was as sharp at that age as most of us are at age 30. Every time I’d talk to him at a woodworking show about his newest offering, I could see the wheels turning in his head as picked my brain for ways to make his inventions even better. We need more guys like Burt in this business.

Here’s more about him from the from the official announcement of his passing:
On August 9, 2013, inventor, engineer and longtime General Tools & Instruments (General®) consultant Burton (Burt) Weinstein lost his battle with cancer at the age of 87. Known as a man of extraordinary kindness, patience, humility and optimism, Burt will be deeply missed by his colleagues at General, those in the woodworking industry and beyond.

In 2006, Burt first met General President and CEO Joe Ennis at the National Hardware Show. At the time, he was aiming to retire and sell his company. Burt and his partner, Richard (Dick) Deaton, founded Simp’l Products in 1989 with the goal of inventing products that would streamline woodworking joinery for both professionals and novices at an affordable price. Impressed by the jointer clamp, doweling jig and pocket hole jig Burt had already created for Simp’l Products, General purchased the company and hired Burt as a consultant.

Burt never quite got the hang of retirement and continued working with General until his passing. Together with the company’s in-house engineers, he redesigned aspects of his jointer clamp, doweling jig and pocket hole jig, which became the cornerstones of General’s E-Z Pro Line of Precision Woodworking Jigs. In conjunction with General, Burt invented two more landmark wood joining tools: the E-Z Pro Mortise & Tenon Jig and E-Z Pro Dovetailer Jig. He often traveled with General to national trade shows where he demonstrated his latest and greatest wood joining innovations to the delight of show attendees.

Over the years, Burt was awarded more than a dozen patents for his inventions. He achieved his first in 1956 for a combination woodworking machine with a tilting arbor that could be converted into a table saw, drill press or lathe. But Burt’s creations went far beyond woodworking. He also developed products for the skiing, boating and medical industries. These included BURT Retractable Bindings that decreased injuries from falls and eased recovery by keeping skis and boots attached via spring-loaded cables; a dolly that enabled the transport of a boat in a laterally vertical orientation; and an endotracheal tube holder that prevented patients from biting the tubing.

A World War II veteran and a man of many talents and interests, Burt was an avid sailor who also enjoyed skiing, flying and fishing, and was a proud member of the City Island and New York Yacht Clubs. He is survived by his wife of 37 years, Carolyn; stepdaughters, Jacquelyn and Gwendolyn Wong; sons-in-law Serge Michaut and Neil Wertheimer; grandchildren Davis and Lucas Wertheimer; brother and sister-in-law Gerald and Alice Weinstein; and many loving nieces and nephews.

New products hit woodworking market at AWFS Fair

The 2013 AWFS Fair (Association of Woodworking & Furnishings Suppliers) in Las Vegas was hot (at least outside) and smaller than past shows, but those manufacturers who did exhibit brought lots of new tools and products to debut. Here are some that most appealed to me:

The most intriguing innovation at the show had to be… Read more

Categories: wood | Tags:
3 Comments

A Weekend Well-Spent

The inaugural Weekend With WOOD event wrapped up on May 19th 2013 in the WOOD magazine shops and world headquarters. And all indications are that it was a huge hit. Of course, don’t take my word for it, instead look at all the grins on these woodworkers’ faces: Read more

Categories: wood | Tags:
5 Comments

2013 – A New Season for the Woodworking Shows

Seems like forever since the last woodworking show in Houston last March. Being addicted to all the activity and camaraderie of the show circuit, it would be a long summer and fall before I would get my fix. This last weekend would finally bring relief in Baltimore as the 2013 season kicked off. Adding to the rush is the new schedule, new ownership and, for me, a new presentation. As Ole’ Willie Nelson would say, I’m “On the Road Again”. Read more

IWF Day 3: Lots of cool tools and accessories

In a show as large as the International Woodworking Fair, where city-block-size industrial setups can dominate nearly all your senses, it can be challenging to not focus on the big, eye-catching stuff and instead find the nuggets sometimes tucked away in small booths. I always commit myself to looking over every booth at these tradeshows in search of new tools and accessories, and this show did not disappoint.

Rockler Woodworking and Hardware took up only a small corner booth, but WOW was it packed with lots of good stuff! Here’s a quick rundown:

• Mixing Mate lids with built-in stir paddles for paint and finish cans. Snap them on, stir, then pour—and never fill up the rim around the lid! Quart size is available now and costs $15; gallon size will be out in January and sell for $20.

Read more

Categories: wood | Tags:
8 Comments

 
 
 
© Copyright , Meredith Corporation. All Rights Reserved | Privacy Policy | By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Service.